• Lucia Joyce

Heavy Or Sweet: Choose Your Own Blog



You have two blog choices today: a heavy, but important one, and a lighter, more playful option. You get to choose, and you will not be judged or burdened in any way by your choice. Because if you're like me, sometimes you're up for taking in and weighing on messy injustice and difficult truths, and sometimes, you need something calm, or playful, to guide you into tomorrow. Because honestly, we all need both, at different times. And today I experienced both heavy truths and light ones, and feel called to share a bit of each.


So, if you want to have a little fun with me and enjoy a little lift because you've had enough of the deep dark world, scroll down to Blog #2 (no one will even know what you chose, so this is entirely up to you my friend). Go ahead and scroll down now. :)

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IF you want to dive into controversy and societal injustice and be reminded of the work ahead of us, while being gently accepted for exactly where you are, feel free to read #1 below. If you're like me, and the day can hold two vibrations at once: juicy gratitude and empathic solidarity, you're welcome to read both.


#1

Don't Let Fear Choose For You

Completely avoiding dialogue on racism and injustice is a choice made in fear.

Lashing out when people trying to bravely raise awareness make you uncomfortable is a choice motivated by fear.

Always siding with the people and practices you've grown up around and had no desire to question even when they seem unfair to minority groups is, unfortunately, a choice made in fear of the foreign unknown. Xenophobia as it is sometimes called.


It's not a crime to be afraid. It's actually a pretty standard fact of life. But there are some fears encouraged and exploited by powerful policy-makers and corrupt leaders. Your fear might cause you to vote for the status quo or 'the old way' of doing things. Your fear might tempt you to hoard and consume in a way that benefits certain businesses. It's not an innately bad thing to be afraid. Fear is an indicator of difficulty, and difficulty is an indicator of growth. But making choices specifically to avoid such growth is... pretty counterproductive, as the world is constantly changing under our feet whether we decide that change is good or not.


Don't let fear ball you up into silence. Don't let fear choose the easiest way out.

Let the desire to conquer your fear inform and educate your actions. Let your fear give way to empathy, and consider whether someone else's fight for a decent living under a fair society will actually harm you in any way. It probably won't. Unless you let conditioned fear overtake you. But in reality, when we lift each other as fellow human beings, we create room for more prosperity, not less. More understanding. More community support. More laughter. More peaceful coexistence. And yeah, the road to these things might have to be paved with riots and burned down Targets, and uncomfortable truths.


Ask yourself if you'd be willing to help your neighbor with something as simple as a contactless supply run. Yes? What if your neighbor was African American, Asian, or Hispanic? What if your neighbor was disabled? Transgender? What if they were a police officer or a Trump supporter? Did your answer change? If it did, I recommend sitting with the 'why'.

We don't have to all live the same way. We don't even have to agree. But our society only works if we acknowledge the inalienable rights of its every human being. And we speed up that acknowledgement by offering to listen, learn, and help. If we're so afraid that we refuse to do any of these things, we have work to do. For some of us, it can only start with what others might consider baby steps, and that's OK. But silently watching or ignoring everything that doesn't pertain to you is not a brave choice. It's letting fear choose for you. Start a dialogue with someone you trust. Read up on the root causes of injustice. Acknowledge our imperfect society and the ways you have either benefitted or been oppressed by it. Watch this eloquent truth bomb from Trevor Noah:

And then do what you can to help. Shaun King is making it really easy to get on a better side of history with simple phone calls, petitions, and up to the minute information on several cases of injustice. There's a lot that can be done without leaving your home or even donating funds: https://www.justiceforbigfloyd.com/


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#2

Jackfruit Wisdom

I spent a lot of time in gratitude today. It seems to be my fallback lately as I am safe and healthy in a beautiful home with people I love, and the various news headlines only drive those truths home.


An unexpected hour of gratitude came in the kitchen today--when I tackled a 13 pound fresh jackfruit that Shane impulse-bought a few days ago. He cut it into 3 pieces, gave us each a little piece to taste, and shelved it in the fridge for another day. As more groceries were attained, the Bowser-shell-esque fruit began to take up a bit too much fridge space. While Shane has been busy with projects in the garage and yard, I have made the kitchen my project domain since we moved last week. I was determined not to let this foreign fruit beast go to waste, as intimidating as it was.


With the help of vegan Youtuber: Sauce Stache, I got the jackfruit gist and pulled the heavy pieces out of the fridge. I couldn't help but indulge in a little resentment--Shane loves to buy things on a whim and leave them in some forgotten corner, as he's already moved on to the next thing, the next bag of curious treats and experiments. Sometimes I meticulously bring the older things to the front and repurpose it all before it goes bad. Sometimes I resent the process, or the waste of things discovered too late.


But I quickly got caught up in the weirdness of jackfruit--its bevy of textures, its banana-like taste and unripe-mango-texture. Its hidden seeds that slide out of leathery pockets. The whole process of cutting and picking apart the edible fruit bits from the rest takes a long time, but is also oddly satisfying. like a video game: just easy enough to keep you engaged. Almost an hour later I had bagged several pounds of the meaty yellow fruit--for snacking on its sweet, fresh form or marinating for savory use. I bagged the seeds too as they can apparently be roasted, and composted the spare parts: pointy outer shell, fibrous, sticky core, and stringy middle bits. The whole process was fascinating and kind of zen. As I picked and sorted and nibbled, my perspective floated into gratitude: for this unbelievable fruit that was flown from across the world before landing in my kitchen, for the time to lovingly devote to its process, and for the love and living presence of a man who would get jazzed about a freaking jackfruit and thrust this zen moment into my day. I thought about my dad, whose mother did the same thing I was doing when he was a young boy in the Philippines, where jackfruit naturally grows (it is said to originate in India). I thought about how many foods I take for granted, the process of which I know so little about: rice, quinoa, olives, nuts, spirits, wine, coffee. So many global staples, handled for hundreds of generations by human minds and hands. And all I can think is, it is a privilege to be here, in communion with this strange and wonderful fruit, pondering our shared existence.


Jackfruit wisdom, folks.



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